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Tag: Start Marriage Right

Love You More: An interview with Michael and Monica Watson, stars of “The 5 Love Languages” book trailer (Start Marriage Right)

If you popped over from Start Marriage Right, welcome! You might be interested in this post, about how and why I got involved with Start Marriage Right. Or this series, on planning my wedding. And most definitely my first-ever giveaway, which ends next Monday, Aug. 6.

When I asked my then-boyfriend Joel if he ever had heard of “The 5 Love Languages,” I think he eye-rolled me. When I asked what his love language was, though, he knew right away.

Love languages are the five ways people primarily give and receive love: through quality time, words of affirmation, gifts, acts of service and physical touch. Gary Chapman describes each in his book “The 5 Love Languages,” published 20 years ago. Since then, it’s been a perennial best-seller, spawning versions for children, applications for the workplace and more. And now, if you grew up in the church, the love languages now are pretty ubiquitous, maybe even eye roll-inducing. They’re like “stop, drop and roll,” only maybe cheesier.

For its milestone anniversary, “The 5 Love Languages” is back with a beachy new cover (much better than the hearts and filigrees on the decade-old copy on my bookshelf); additional resources that are hip with the kids like Chapman’s book “Things I Wish I’d Known Before We Got Married,” the Love Language Challenge app, the Start Marriage Right website and the Staying Engaged email newsletter; its own song; and a three-minute video. That video stars songwriter Michael Watson of West Coast rock-pop band Above the Golden State and his real-life wife, Monica Watson, a model and actress and associate producer for Faceout Films, the Bend, Ore.-based production company behind the book trailer.

I interviewed Michael and Monica about how the song, the video and how the book still is relevant today. They, in turn, made me want to move to Bend, Ore., immediately.

P.S. My love language is gifts. Do with that what you will.

Start Marriage Right: So how do you decide what to take and what not to take, and how do you stay true to those boundaries you’ve set or that mission you’ve purposed in that environment?

Monica Watson: I think a lot of it is kind of what Michael and I have decided as a married couple what we stand for and what we want our mission to be. When we talk about projects that come in, when we’re trying to decide whether we say yes or no to them, or whether to take a gig or not take a gig, I think it all comes down to, “Does this line up with the mission God has for us?” I think that knowing that mission is really huge, so you can reflect that off the project: “Should I take this role or not?” “Should I take this gig or not?” There isn’t really an easy answer.

For the rest of the story, read Love You More: An interview with Michael and Monica Watson, stars of “The 5 Love Languages” book trailer (Start Marriage Right).

For more ideas on creating “your marriage mission” with your spouse, read this excellent article by my fellow Start Marriage Right writer Samuel Rainey.

Photo credit: Start Marriage Right, courtesy of Michael and Monica Watson. Squiggles divider by IROCKSOWHAT.

The Story of Ian & Larissa (Start Marriage Right)

If you popped over from Start Marriage Right, welcome! You might be interested in this post, about how and why I got involved with Start Marriage Right. Or this series on planning my wedding, which will continue all month.

Earlier this month, when Desiring God posted its now-viral video “The Story of Ian & Larissa,” I posted it here and asked what it meant. It took me a few days to gather my thoughts, “trembling with the glad responsibility” of writing about the video for Start Marriage Right. What could I possibly add?

One of the thoughts tumbling around in my brain appeared on Her.meneutics yesterday, better than I possibly could have expressed it; another, finally, in my post on Start Marriage right today.

By now, you’ve probably seen the video, the story of Ian & Larissa, of their “momentary marriage.”

The video was watched about 86,000 times Tuesday, May 8, when it was posted online by Desiring God, which shares resources from John Piper’s ministry. By the end of that week, it had been watched more than 442,000.

It starts no different than any other couple’s wedding highlights reel, except maybe for the bride’s exquisite taste: A sun-dappled outdoor ceremony, bridesmaids in flower-print dresses, finally, the bride herself in cowboy boots, nearly running down the aisle.

Then you see the groom, and you know this is no ordinary couple or wedding or marriage.

Ian Murphy suffered a traumatic brain injury in a car accident in September 2006 on his way to work outside Philadelphia. He and his then-girlfriend had planned to marry after they graduated college that December. Instead, Larissa wrote in a post on the Desiring God blog, they “waited four years and got married when he was sick and disabled and we were still grieving.”

Days after seeing the video, I still was trying to collect my thoughts. I watched it again. I posted it on Facebook. I “trembled with the glad responsibility” of sharing the story of Ian & Larissa with others, as Piper did. I asked them what it meant.

For the rest of the story, read The Story of Ian & Larissa (Start Marriage Right).

Linking up with:

This Momentary Marriage: The Story of Ian & Larissa

By now, you’ve probably seen the video, the story of Ian & Larissa, of “this momentary marriage.”

The video was watched more than 86,000 times Wednesday, when it was posted online by Desiring God, which shares resources from the ministry of John Piper. It since has been watched more than 305,000.

I saw it yesterday, and I still am gathering my thoughts, planning to write a post about this for Start Marriage Right. I’d love to hear yours.

The S-Word (Submission) (Start Marriage Right)

If you popped over from Start Marriage Right, welcome! You might be interested in this post, about how and why I got involved with Start Marriage Right. Or this series on planning my wedding, which will continue all month.

I’m starting in on the controversial stuff over on Start Marriage Right, thanks to Renee Fisher and the infuriating book she lent me, the one with “help meet” in the title. The whole time I was reading it, I was thinking of these sort-of mind-blowing words from my pastor…

The best and worst (read: most squirm-inducing) part of premarital counseling was when our pastor asked us to read Ephesians 5:22-33 and explain what it meant to us. If you are engaged or newly wed, or a woman, I don’t need to tell you this is the passage that begins, “Wives submit to your husbands….”

I was honest: I’ve always struggled with this passage, I said. But maybe it wasn’t so bad. I trusted Joel, and I knew he wouldn’t make any decision that didn’t put me first. Joel said something equally diplomatic about the heavy responsibility of decision-making.

Then our pastor asked,

“Where does it say anything about decision-making?”

For the rest of the story, read The S-Word (Submission) (Start Marriage Right).

Linking up with:

Photo credit: Start Marriage Right.

Of fatwas, faith and film: An interview with Steve Taylor (Start Marriage Right)

If you popped over from Start Marriage Right, welcome! You might be interested in this post, about how and why I got involved with Start Marriage Right. You also might be interested in this little party my husband Joel and I threw.

This is my second post now for Start Marriage Right, and I’m pretty excited about it. Not only did I get to see “Blue Like Jazz,” the movie adaption of one of my all-time favorite books, but also I got to talk to filmmaker Steve Taylor afterward. Here’s what Taylor had to say about the film, about whether “Blue Like Jazz” author Donald Miller is as “winsome” as he seems and about that “fatwa” against their film.

Start Marriage Right: What is it about this movie then, before anybody had even seen it, that would make them uncomfortable?

Steve Taylor: I honestly don’t know. The one thing I’d said early on, because it was four years trying to make this movie, was, “This is not a family movie. You cannot tell this story in the context of a family movie. You can’t do it accurately.” The overwhelming response I got from that blog posting years ago was a combination of, “Duh,” and, “Well, of course you have to have (that kind of) content. Why would we see a movie like that if it didn’t feel real to us?” So I don’t think this is an issue for most people, and I think most of us would agree that as much as we all love the idea of family entertainment, the thought of any media that has to do with Christianity having to be de facto safe for the whole family — that’s not a good development. I don’t see how anybody would think that was a good thing. I understand why some Christian radio stations might want to brand themselves that way, or some media companies might want to brand themselves, but if the public starts thinking that they’re interchangeable, that’s not good for Christianity, and that’s not good for family entertainment.”

For the rest of the story, read Of fatwas, faith and film: An interview with Steve Taylor (Start Marriage Right).

Photo credit: Echowhitefox Photography.